Origin Magazine: Second Series (Complete Run: Issues No. 1-14). Ryunosuke Akutagawa, Margaret Avison, Carol Berge, Paul Blackburn, William Bronk, Bill Burnett, Paul Carrol, Rene Char, Tao Ch’ien, Cid Corman, Robert Creeley, Jean-Paul de Dadelsen, Robert Duncan, Larry Eigner, Theodore Enslin, Luciano Erba, Clayton Eshleman, Enzo Fabiani, Seymour Faust, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Giuliano Gramigna, Margherita Guidacci, Steve Jonas, Robert Kelly, Shimpei Kusano, Giacomo Leopardi, Denise Levertov, Michael McClure, Thomas McNichols, Eugenio Montale, Barbara Moraff, Lorine Niedecker, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Cesare Pavese, Saint-John Perse, Donald L. Philippi, Pablo Picasso, Francis Ponge, Sir Herbert Read, Nelo Risi, Alberico Sala, Frank Samperi, Roberto Sanesi, Rocco Scotellaro, Gary Snyder, Mary Ellen Solt, Mel Strawn, Emilio Tadini, Su Tung-p’o, Gael Turnbull, Cesar Vallejo, Paolo Violponi, Philip Whalen, Yashima, Zeami, Motokiyo, Celia Zukofsky, Louis Zukofsky.
Origin Magazine: Second Series (Complete Run: Issues No. 1-14)
Origin Magazine: Second Series (Complete Run: Issues No. 1-14)

Origin Magazine: Second Series (Complete Run: Issues No. 1-14)

Kyoto, Japan: Origin Press, 1961-1964. First Printing. Stapled Wrappers. 9 of 14 Issues Signed and/or with Marginalia by Noted Poet, Translator, Essayist & Origin Contributor, Clayton Eshleman. "Cid Corman was preparing to edit the Second Series of ORIGIN magazine when I knocked on his boardinghouse door in San Francisco, 1960. We had already exchanged a few letters, and one, Corman's response to a group of student poems I had submitted to ORIGIN, had made me break into tears while reading it. In bolt-from-the-blue fashion it said: get serious about poetry or forget it. When I met Cid, he was brooding about Ginsberg, Burroughs and the Beats, whom he felt were "sick." The new ORIGIN series, to be anchored by the serialization of Zukofsky's "A," was to provide an "open" alternative...While his responses were aggressively pedagogical (some of which was undoubtedly an echo of the pounding he had taken from Olson), he was astute and awesomely dedicated, so when I moved to Kyoto about a year after Cid had, I started seeing him on a regular basis. He would leave his room in the afternoon, browse in the Maruzen bookstore or visit art galleries, eat downtown, and with books, letters, notebooks, etc. "retire" to the Muse coffee shop until about 11 P.M. If you wanted to see Cid, you called on him at his "office" there. Over the next two years, I dropped in once or twice a week, and learned the rudiments of translation and magazine editing...I watched him on a weekly basis assemble issues of ORIGIN..." So wrote Clayton Eshleman, previous owner of and contributor to this Second Series of Origin Magazine. As Eshleman has confirmed in his conversations with us, he personally obtained these issues from Cid's hands very soon after each one was printed--making these copies not only among the very first printed, but personally obtained from the hands of the immortal publisher and celebrated poet & translator, Cid Corman. Even though Corman later appreciated Allen Ginsberg's work, to have declared a decidedly anti-Beat aim in 1960 was interesting to say the least. Even more interesting about it was that there may be more "Beat"-affiliated writers published in the Second Series than any other series: Carol Berge (also publishing in Ed Sanders' "Fuck You/A Magazine of the Arts," Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, and Michael McClure among them. Another unique aspect when considering the list of Second Series contributors was the Surrealist angle, represented by Rene Char & Saint-John Perse, and the inclusion of Spanish master Cesar Vallejo (who Eshleman translated) and Pier Paolo Pasolini, a favorite of Lawrence Ferlinghetti's. As if that weren't a wide-enough net, Corman also obtained a contribution from Pablo Picasso, who needs no introduction. The second series of Origin Magazine only ran 14 issues because Corman--getting a taste of his own medicine--was admonished so severely by Zukofsky that he should focus solely on publishing Zukofsky that Corman seriously considered his advice and cut off the Second Series at the 14th issue, which contains Corman's landmark (and arguably the greatest ever rendered) English translation of Basho's "Back Roads to Far Towns." The attentive reader will also note the printing error sustained in Issue No. 13, where on verso wrapper it mistakenly says "Origin 12 / April 1964" when Issue No. 12 came out three months prior to this in January 1964. In contrast to our exceedingly lengthy condition-grading applied in our curations of the First and Third Series of Origin Magazine, we will here opt instead for a shorter, generalized condition grading. All issues contain minor, moderate or significant rubbing; slight rusting and/or bleeding to staples; age-toning to fine-edges esp. nearest spine-edge; moderate to heavy chipping to same; slight, scattered nicks, scuffs, indentations and bumping; minute age-toning and select scuffs or slight staining to text block; the wrappers of a few issues are more fragile than others. Issues 3-7, 9-11 & 14 have Eshleman's ownership signatures at the top left-hand corner of recto wrapper and issues 10 & 13 contain marginalia in purple and yellow, respectively. Issue No. 13 contains the original laid-in, signed stoneprint by "W.P." and Issue No. 8 contains the original laid-in mimeographed replication of Louis and Celia Zukofsky's "Catallus XXXIX," which has sat in the issue of origin in question for 55 years as of the time of this writing (January 1963 to January 2018) and has bled its beige color onto the first page of Issue No. 8 (Cid Corman, January 1963). Very Good-Near Fine. [Item #3024]

Price: $500.00