Blue Beat Jacket No. 13 (January 1998). Yusuke Keida, John Bennett, Gregory Corso, Steve Dalachinsky, Allen Ginsberg, Herschel Silverman, Harry Smith, Michael White, A. D. Winans.
Blue Beat Jacket No. 13 (January 1998)

Blue Beat Jacket No. 13 (January 1998)

Niigata, Japan: Blue Jacket Press, 1988. First Printing. Stringbound in Wraps. This issue of the rare Japanese Beat-devoted literary periodical "...featuring Beat and Post-Beat Independent and modern writings" edited by Yusuke Keida is partially a tribute to Allen Ginsberg, who had died on April 5 of the previous year. The magazine contains (among many other things) an excellent and intimately-revealing essay titled: "Naked Awareness" by Michael White, in which White describes a dinner with Gregory Corso and Harry Smith. He talks of a 58-year old Corso's penchant for setting off cherry bombs in public places; also of Gregory discussing his sexual preferences in graphic detail (all the while lamenting that "nobody" will have sex with him). Corso continues by disparaging Allen Ginsberg vociferously, calling him "a fascist" because he'd had Peter Orlovsky committed to a mental institute. Another interesting note is where White asks if Harry Smith was ever married, to which he was given the response: "No...but...Harry had helped to raise a young boy. That he wasn't Harry's son but that his name was "Harley." There's little doubt that this must be "Harley Flanagan," "author" of the exceedingly rare "Stories & Illustrations by Harley" from Charlatan Press. [TMB Item #2056]. Harley Flanagan, at the time of that book's release was "...a nine year-old boy living on the lower east side of NYC with his Hippie mother known as "Rosebud," [who] "...drew & described his impressions of their travels to Morocco in "The Shopkeeper and his Donkey." Rosebud apparently lived on Ginsberg's East Hill Farm in Cherry Valley, NY and wrote the introduction for her son Harley's book. Flanagan grew up to be a founding member in the post-punk hardcore band The Cro Mags. It is well known that Harry Smith spent time on Ginsberg's farm, and this is where he would have "helped raise" Harley. The late, beloved Steve Dalachinsky also appears with his "perfect spring day (for allen ginsberg)" poem, and the great A.D. Winans appears with his biting classic: "ON WHY I WRITE POLITICAL POEMS AND DON'T GIVE POETRY READINGS ANYMORE." In very fine condition with only slight shelf-wear to fine-edges; three small smudges near bottom right-hand corner of back cover; small bump to top right-hand corner of same. Very Fine. [Item #3859]

Price: $30.00