3 Essential Works by Tom Wolfe: The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Kandy Colored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers. Tom Wolfe.
3 Essential Works by Tom Wolfe: The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Kandy Colored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers

3 Essential Works by Tom Wolfe: The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Kandy Colored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers

New York, NY: Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux in Conjunction with Quality Paper Books, 1990. First Edition Thus. Softcover. This husky compilation gathers three essential works by the great Tom Wolfe (1930-2018), best known for his 1968 masterwork (itself included here), “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.” This work—although alternately loathed and begrudgingly accepted by Ken Kesey, whose transformation from “great American novelist” to self-proclaimed “lightning rod” is amusingly charted in its pages—is a favorite of this writer; a transformative classic that can veritably summon the “spirit” of the 1960s and its psychedelic revolution if placed in the hands of the right reader. Also included is Wolfe’s work which preceded this, the stylistically-similar and oft-overlooked title, “The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby.” Also included is another controversial, though essential (and curiously relevant) work by Wolfe, 1970s “Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers. “Radical Chic” covers Wolfe’s account of a party thrown for the Black Panthers and hosted by conductor Leonard Bernstein, his wife, the actress Felicia Cohn Montealegre, and a panoply of his wealthy, satellite-socialite friends. Still today, the phrase “radical chic” describes the adoption of radical or faux-radical causes by Hollywood, high-society, and the elites. “Mau Mauing the Flak Catchers” is set in San Francisco at the city’s “Office of Economic Opportunity.” This arm of the city government was responsible for administering the city’s antipoverty programs, but Wolfe presents a picture of an essentially corrupt bureaucratic enterprise helmed by hustlers and useful only in its ability to fortify resentments. “Mau-Mauing” refers to the militant intimidation tactics of Kenya’s anti-colonial “Mau Mau Uprising,” and the “Flak Catchers” are pushover city bureaucrats who are themselves physically, verbally, and psychologically abused as an attempt at reparations becomes an agitation towards a sadistic and illiberal reversal of roles neither should want or be able to play. An essential Wolfe work that seems to only grow more relevant with age. Book in very fine condition with only slightest shelf-wear to fine-edges. Very Fine. [Item #4006]

Price: $30.00

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