The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2). William S. Burroughs.
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)
The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)

The Last Words of Dutch Schultz: a Fiction in the Form of a Film Script (1) with: White Subway (2)

New York, NY; London, England: Viking Press; Aloes Books, 1971; 1975. First American Edition; First Edition Thus. Hardcover; Softcover. (Shoaf, 19f. p. 35). (1) In his important early critical study of WSB, “William Burroughs: the Algebra of Need,” Eric Mottram writes that in this work, “…Dutch Schultz’s mob, the federal government’s power…move in a continuous sphere of action within the monologue of the dying gangster, a deathbed ‘last words’ under police interrogation, transcribed by a police stenographer, which itself hallucinates a timeless present for the actual sequentially of a lifetime.” (p. 242). Subtitled “A Fiction in the Form of a Film Script,” it is written in a divided action/sound format accompanied by a bevy of historic photos from the time of Dutch Schultz. This is a short-but-significant work of Burroughs’ robust middle-period, during which he enjoyed princely status as a grey-flesh oracle whose junk-studded history spoke to a niche brand of urchin-heroism. This was, of course, tied directly to the suitcoat-wisdom, the ‘venerable seniority’ that came along with the “legend” of Burroughs’ from Kerouac onward, along with WSB’s (very legitimate) grand-paternal position in the New York Underground. First published in Britain in a trade edition as well as in a limited, signed and numbered edition of 100 in 1970 (see Maynard & Miles, A17 pp. 66-69) with a different text and without the divided format and photos which accompany the First American Edition of 1975 offered here. “A battered black Packard halfway down the block. The radiator steams. Fats Columbo is at the wheel. Vincent and Peter Coll are in the back seat. Vincent Coll has a machine gun in his lap…Suddenly a pillar of steam from the overheated radiator blows back across the windshield, cutting Columbo’s view. The car swerves wildly…Coll leans out the back window and sprays the block with machine-gun bullets.” (p. 49). Another passage: “Four mobsters smoking opium in a dimly-lit room. The pipe is a bottle with pinhole and a rubber tube. Scene is hermetic, reptilian.” (p. 51). An essential and (uncharacteristically) approachable read for the budding Burroughsian, the Beat Enthusiast, and the general reader alike. [SBN: 670-41950-8]. In addition to this First American Edition of Dutch Schultz, this bundle includes the underappreciated classic “White Subway” published in London by our friend-&-colleague the great Jim Pennington (through his Aloes Books imprint) in 1973. “White Subway” compiles sixteen short works of imagination by WSB from the late-fifties to the mid-1960s, all originally published in a variety of independent journals like The Paris Review, Big Table and the Birmingham Bulletin (where the opening routine “Unfinished Cigarette” was published in its second issue of Autumn, 1963). But wait: there’s more! – which, in our oh-so-fortunate case, means two short-but-classic essays on WSB and his milieu. The first of which is by the great multilingual onetime secretary to W.H. Auden and all-night-talkathon-compadre of Jack Kerouac, Alan Ansen, who contributes the must-read “Anyone Who Can Pick Up a Frying Pan Owns Death.” Last but surely not least, we have the great Paul Bowles appearing with his piece entitled: “Burroughs in Tangier.” Both of these were initially published in Big Table 2. This copy is from the third and final printing of 1974, but “White Subway”—perhaps because of how truly great of an assemblage of routines is gathered here—has never been a “cheap” rarity in the Burroughs oeuvre. This said, third printings were still produced under the judicious and watchful eye-and-auspices of Mr. Pennington, and in this sense enjoy a provenance much more in line with the mimeo magazine appearances of WSB than they are trade editions from big New York publishers. An essential addition to any Burroughs-&-Beyond library. (Maynard & Miles A24, pgs. 85-87). (1) Book in very fine condition with only slight shelf-wear to fine-edges; otherwise quite clean, one of the better copies we have seen. Dust-jacket in a strong fine-very fine condition; the only factors preventing a single description as “very fine” are a small closed tear at the top left-hand corner of front cover; slight rubbing near leftmost spine-edge of same; similar slight rubbing at rightmost fine-edge of same; minute spotting to leftmost fine-edge of back cover; tiny instance of chipping at bottom fine-edge of same near center-middle. (2) Book in fine condition with modest shelf-wear to fine-edges; slight bump to bottom right-hand corner of front cover; similar minute bumps to top left, bottom left-hand corners of back cover; a few tiny horizontal, vertical creases at rightmost fine-edges of same near spine. Very Fine; Fine / Very Fine. [Item #4021]

Price: $150.00