Opus International No. 4 (December 1967). William S. Burroughs, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Bob Kaufman, Claude Pelieu, Andrei Voznesensky.
Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)
Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)
Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)
Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)
Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)

Opus International No. 4 (December 1967)

Paris, France: Opus International, 1967. First Printing. Sewn Wrappers. This vintage 1967 issue of the French-Language literary-&-cultural magazine “Opus International” edited by Jean-Clarence Lambert is notable in its featuring a “U.S. Resistance” section, more-fully titled “Greeting the American Resistance Fighters.” It begins with a French-language translation of Allen Ginsberg’s 1964 essay in the Times Literary Supplement, “Back to the Wall,” accompanied by the immortal photograph of the Uncle Sam top-hatted Ginsberg photograph by Fred McDarrah. Next comes the great William S. Burroughs as translated by Claude Pelieu and Mary Beach, appearing with a short piece titled: “Burning Heavens, Idiot (a Fragment).” Following WSB is an excellent collage by Pelieu which segues directly into Ginsberg’s poem “New York-San Francisco”—again translated by the Beach-Pelieu team. Pelieu then contributes text in the form of his piece “Julliet 1967,” followed by Ferlinghetti’s “SAN FRANCISCO LE 25 SEPTEMBRE 1967.” Ferlinghetti, of course knew French and either originally wrote his entry in French or translated it himself. On the right-facing page is the iconic photograph of the young Lawrence in the City Lights basement in front of the “I AM THE DOOR” sign. Below Ferlinghetti are two panels from Andy Warhol’s 1963 “Race Riots” series—such is the way this magazine goes! Directly before the aforementioned “American Resistance” section is a Soviet section that includes a celebrated figure often associated with The Beats, Andrei Voznesensky, who appears with the piece “Anti-Mondes.” In addition to the aforementioned delights, the review/advertisements/catch-up-on-art-around-the-world section in the back is quite fun, too. It jumps from country to country in small segments telling you what’s hip in Bucharest, Italy, and other places before segueing into notes on James Brown and a number of Jazz musicians. Opus International magazine was quintessentially countercultural, always featuring the newest, the strangest, and the best in Art, Graphic Design, Literature, Music & Poetry from all around the world during that headiest of years, 1967. We have included photos of the Table of Contents so all interested can see the entire list of eccentric contributors. All text in French. (Maynard & Miles, C181, pg. 154; Shoaf, Section III, No. 113, pg. 135; Schottlaender, C168., pg. 46). Slightly larger trade format softcover in sewn-binding. Magazine in fine condition with minute shelf-wear to fine-edges; small, scattered scratches, rubbing to front, back covers; vertical crease running through spine—no doubt from comprehensive reading by the magazine’s former owner, Brian Schottlaender, author of "Anything But Routine," the most complete & up-to-date WSB bibliography now in its fourth ever-expanding online edition. We always consult our good friend Brian's ABR for all our WSB-related rarities, as above. Fine. [Item #4642]

Price: $50.00