South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life. Charles Bukowski.
South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life
South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life
South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life

South of No North: Stories of the Buried Life

Los Angeles, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1973. First Trade Edition. Softcover. Dedicated to Poet’s Poet and Great Friend of Poetry in the Bay Area, the late Ann Menebroker, the prolific Charles Bukowski’s “South of No North” is a book of short stories that many Bukowski initiates feel is among his best. Two fan-&-critical favorites included in this collection are “Confessions of a Man Insane Enough to Live With Beasts” (originally published as a chapbook by Bensenville Mimeo Press in 1965) and “All the Assholes in the World Plus Mine” (we at TMB recommend a viewing of the great John Dullaghan documentary “Bukowski: Born Into This” for the backstory [pun intended] on that!). This early Black Sparrow Press edition dates back to the days in which John Martin, a D.H. Lawrence collector who had built a successful office supply company in Los Angeles in the 1960s, took the then late-middle aged Bukowski under his wing—making Bukowski virtually the “flagship” writer of this new enterprise, Black Sparrow Press. He sold his D.H. Lawrence collection to UC Santa Barbara to fund his new publishing venture, and it was in 1969 that Martin offered Bukowski $100 a month to quit his job and write full-time, an offer Bukowski accepted. Bukowski had been publishing short stories and poems in many of the signature outlets of the “Mimeograph Revolution,” underground publishing operations like Jon & Gypsy Lou Webb's storied "Loujon Press" and the equally-legendary d.a.levy "7 Flowers Press." The fateful, fortuitous meeting with John Martin won Bukowski something he had never experienced: a man of considerable means willing to back him. Before this, Bukowski was essentially a candidate without donors, heralded only by his fellow denizens of the underground. Martin stepped in as no one before; he saw Bukowski as one of the quintessential American voices of the 20th Century, Whitman on a barstool at 4 P.M. With Bukowski’s genius and his own business acumen, Martin saw that vision through. Readers everywhere continue to discover Bukowski’s poetry, novels, and short stories—and when it comes to the latter, this is the collection that every Bukowski reader/collector/enthusiast needs. Trade-format Softcover, First Trade Edition. From the collection of Erin Black Matson, the artist & poet who along with her then-husband, the acclaimed poet-educator Clive Matson, was a member of the Beat Generation-morphing into the hippie counterculture in NYC during the 1960s. The Matsons were friends & protégé-collaborators in a circle that included Herbert Huncke, Bonnie Bremser et al. The condition of this item (see below) befits its inclusion in the library of a Bona Fide Beat who appears to have remained true to (never recovered from?) those heady days. First trade edition, an early Black Sparrow Press softcover. Book in very good condition with slight shelf-wear, moderate-to-pronounced rubbing, spotting, smudging throughout; slight, scattered staining, browning to front, back covers; two coffee rings (truly Beat!) on front cover; small half-moon coffee ring on back cover at center-middle; slight scattered spotting to text block. Near Fine. [Item #4678]

Price: $20.00 save 10% $18.00

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