Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses. William Eastlake.
Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses
Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses
Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses
Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses

Portrait of an Artist with 26 Horses

New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 1963. First Printing. Hardcover. "With eyes wet and huge the deer watched; the young man watched back. The youth was crouching over a spring as though talking to the ground, the water pluming up bright through his turquoise-ringed hand, then eddying back in the bottomless whorl it had sculptured neat and sharp in the orange rock. The rock retreated to a blue then again to an almost chrome yellow at the foot of the deer. The deer was coy, hesitant and grease-wood-camouflaged excepting the eyes that watched, limpid and wild. The young man called Twenty-six Horses made a sweeping arc, raising his ringed hand from the spring. The deer wheeled and fled noiselessly in the soft looping light..." (pg. 9, Ch. 1). So reads an excerpt from the opening paragraph of William Eastlake's (1917-1997) "Portrait of an Artist with Twenty-Six Horses," the third and final installment in the Eastlake's "Checkerboard Trilogy" series of novels. Though Eastlake was born to British parents in Brooklyn, NY in 1917, his 'origin story' as a novelist begins in the early 1940s with his employment at the Stanley Rose Bookstore in Los Angeles, California. The Stanley Rose Bookstore was no ordinary bookstore--it was a literary hangout for some of the greatest fiction novelists of the twentieth century. It was a place where the likes of Nathanael West, William Saroyan, John Steinbeck and their contemporaries could frequently be found kibitzing between the shelves. In addition to this, Eastlake notably embarked upon a pilgrimage to visit William Faulkner in 1943; a fitting capstone to Eastlake's legendary orbit of associations--surely the stuff of dreams for any aspiring fiction writer of that era. As it pertains to Eastlake's connection with The Beat Generation, the 400-acre ranch in Cuba, New Mexico that Eastlake purchased in 1955 was a Mecca for writers--a place often visited by Beat/Black Mountain-&-Beyond poet Robert Creeley. Hardcover in unclipped dust-jacket; First Edition, First Printing as stated on copyright page. Book in very fine condition with slightest shelf-wear to fine-edges; handsome illustrated boards quite clean, worthy of any Beat-&-Beyond collection. Dust-jacket in near condition with moderate-to-pronounced shelf-wear, chipping & closed tears to fine-edges of front, back covers; moderate-to pronounced rubbing, spotting to same. Very Fine / Near Fine. [Item #4734]

Price: $60.00

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