To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition). Allen Ginsberg, Richard Eberhart.
To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)
To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)
To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)
To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)
To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)

To Eberhart from Ginsberg (The Signed & Numbered Edition)

Lincoln, MA: Pennmaen Press, 1976. Limited First Edition. Hardcover. Signed by Allen Ginsberg & Richard Eberhart. "What I didn't say to Eberhart: 'Howl' is really about my mother, in her last year at Pilgrim State Hospital--acceptance of her, later inscribed in 'Kaddish' detail. The campaign of vilification and denigration that the first "Beat" texts met--interpreted from the Partisan Review thru TIME and even in FBI files as incomprehensible anti-social wild-eyed hate-filled irrational rebellious protest--was what I was foreseeing and trying to avoid as politely and straightforwardly as possible." (from Introduction, Pg. 11). "From Eberhart to Ginsberg" contains, as the title page suggests, "...an explanation by Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) of his publication HOWL and Richard Eberhart's noteworthy New York Times article, "West Coast Rhythms." This short compilation of writings additionally features 'new' commentary by both poets and relief etchings by artist Jerome Kaplan. This highly desirable rarity from the Ginsberg canon offers substantive insight not only into “Howl” (as a poem) and the circumstances surrounding the Beats’ rocky rise to fame, but it unknowingly represents an “Inflection Point” in the Life, Thought & Career of Allen Ginsberg. This inflection point has everything to do with Allen’s increasing involvement with his ‘religious mentor,’ the highly-controversial Chogyam Trungpa and the sybaritic mutations of Buddhism he hawked. The vocational, visionary center from which the landscape-altering early work emerged (best represented, perhaps, by AG’s 1965 “Paris Review Interview” with the Prolific-&-Underappreciated Tom Clark) is almost entirely abdicated by Ginsberg in his commentary, here. When he does in fact reference the formative considerations he once championed, it is only to distance himself from them. An example of this trend as quoted from the text: "At the time I believed in some sort of God and thus Angels, and religiousness--at present as Buddhist I see an awakened emptiness (Sunyata) as the crucial term. No God, no Self, not even great Whitman's universal Self...The defect in these poems & this letter to Richard Eberhardt is the insistence on a divine self rather than a relatively heavenly emptiness." (Pg. 12). In the attempt to haphazardly weld the Buddhist insistence on being "egoless" onto the poetic orientation taught to him by Kerouac and exemplified by the major early work, Ginsberg functionally renounces the concepts which generated his most landscape-altering classics. The year in which this publication saw release, 1976, was at the very moment in which the "Second Aleister Crowley of the 20th Century," to obliquely paraphrase Kenneth Rexroth, was amplifying his psychic grip on Ginsberg while they worked to get The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa Institute on its feet. Hardcover issued without dust-jacket; the Limited, Numbered Edition (#238/300) featuring signatures by both Eberhardt (in thin, blue fountain pen ink) and Ginsberg (in black fountain pen ink) at colophon. From the collection of Erin Black Matson, the late artist-poet who with her then-husband, the acclaimed poet & educator Clive Matson, were bona fide members of the Beat Generation as it morphed into the hippie counterculture during the 1960s. The Matsons were colleagues-protégés (in lifestyle as much as literature) of Herbert Huncke, Bonnie Bremser et al. The condition befits its long ownership & use by Erin, who was a tried-&-true Beat-Bohemian to the very end. Book in a strong Near Fine condition with slight, age-typical toning, spotting to text block; moderate-to-significant slight rubbing to select areas of front, back covers; a few points of light, low-visibility staining to same. Near Fine. [Item #4784]

Price: $100.00