The Last of the Moccasins. Charles Plymell.
The Last of the Moccasins
The Last of the Moccasins

The Last of the Moccasins

San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books, 1971. First Edition. Softcover. When asked about 'The Last of the Moccasins' and "...who he was and who he was hanging out with..." at the time of its composition, Charles Plymell (b. 1935) responded with this: "Unfortunately, I was teaching and getting a free M.A. at [Johns] Hopkins. I wrote 'Last of the Moccasins' as my master's thesis. I had been working on docks in San Francisco and two different people from the writing seminar came out to recruit me. Ginsberg came to read, and I was asked to introduce him. I said, "Drop your socks and grab your cocks...here's Allen Ginsberg." He looked embarrassed. I'd finally out-shocked him! I was going to take a poetry job at Carnegie-Mellon but a classmate "...cried over the job," so I let him take it. I didn't know where Pittsburgh was anyway. He's still there as a poetry chair professor grinding out workshop poetry chapbooks, a job I wouldn't want anyway. I was going to go back to S.F. but we landed on the Bowery then took Ginsy to the William F. Buckley show where I almost got in a fight with Kerouac. We took Allen on to Cherry Valley via the Big Pink house in Saugerties and we stayed in Cherry Valley..." (Garret Caples Interview with Charles Plymell, City Lights Bookstore Blog, April 27, 2017)." A quintessentially Plymellian answer, to be sure: one which manages--in a single anecdotal flourish--to name-drop his many famous friends, reference a Forrest Gumpian run-in, AND scorn the Moloch of Academia…the abject impotence of which Plymell still-to-this-day derides. Especially notable is the back cover quote from William S. Burroughs, Founder's Founder of the Beat Generation & the Patron Saint-Demon of our enterprise. Burroughs--occasionally generous, but seldom unthinking in his praise--contributes the following blurb to the constellation of endorsements on the back cover. "Plymell has as much in depth to say about death as Hemingway did and a lot more to say about it in terms of the present generation still-born into a world that can offer nothing...a manifesto of ashes." A defining work in the expansive and consistent Plymell canon. From the collection of Erin Black Matson, the late artist-poet who with her then-husband, the acclaimed poet & educator Clive Matson, were bona fide members of the Beat Generation as it morphed into the hippie counterculture during the 1960s. The Matsons were colleagues-protégés (in lifestyle as much as literature) of Herbert Huncke, Bonnie Bremser et al. In fine condition with only light-to-moderate shelf-wear to fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine; a few exhibits of slight rubbing to same; minute age-typical toning & spotting to text block. Fine. [Item #4853]

Price: $20.00