Good Wild Sacred. Gary Snyder.
Good Wild Sacred
Good Wild Sacred
Good Wild Sacred
Good Wild Sacred

Good Wild Sacred

Madley, UK: Five Seasons Press, 1984. First Trade Edition. Softcover in Sewn Wrappers. "I live on land in the Sierra Nevada of Alta California, continent of Turtle Island, which is somewhat wild and not terribly good. The indigenous people there, the Nisenan or Southern Maidu, were almost entirely displaced or destroyed during the first decade of the gold rush. Consequently we have no one to teach us which parts of that landscape were once thought to be sacred, but with much time and attention, I think we will be able to identify such sites again. Wild land, sacred land, good land. At home developing our mountain farmland, in town at political meetings, and farther afield studying the problems of indigenous peoples, I hear each of these terms emerging. By examining these three categories perhaps we can get some further insights into the problems of rural habitation, subsistence living, wilderness preservation, and third- and fourth-world resistance of the appetites of industrial civilization." (Pg. 1). Works like these exemplify the true philosophical uniqueness of each of the Beats, and certainly sit on the side of the argument which would claim them as inordinately resistant to categorization of the meaningful sort. Take the above-quoted passage from Gary Snyder (b. 1930 & still alive as of this writing), the legendary cosmopolitan poet whose Beat bona-fides harken all the way back to the Six Gallery Reading at which Allen Ginsberg's "HOWL" was first unveiled--to the very dawn of the First San Francisco Renaissance. If a critical-philosophical lens was applied the above-quoted passage, one could easily count Snyder among the Neo-Rousseauians, and carelessly toss him in with the Postmodernists, more broadly. Such analysis is of limited use, however, when the totality of Snyder's life, work, and philosophy are considered. Snyder, for one, never fell victim to the red-hued fever dreams of the Marxist Neo-Rousseauians, and his leftism is far more libertarian (or outright anarchist) in comparison. His political activities were passionately localized, and--with regard to his lifelong environmental activism, he largely chose to live by example. This is in marked contrast to what the Neo-Rousseauians of the "New Left" would prescribe, and renders Snyder's reverence for tradition a borderline conservative sentiment...agreeing (on a fundamental level) that the wholesale abdication of tradition (and "who" and "what" came before, more generally) leads to relative listlessness and poverty of the spiritual sort. Such is the intellectual uniqueness of the Beats, exemplified here by one of their best. [ISBN: 0-947960-00-7]. Softcover in sewn wrappers: the First Trade Edition of 1984, limitation unknown. From the collection of Erin Black Matson, the artist & poet who along with her then-husband, the acclaimed poet-educator Clive Matson, were members of the Beat Generation-morphing into the hippie counterculture in NYC during the 1960s. The Matsons were friends & protégé-collaborators in a circle that included Herbert Huncke, Bonnie Bremser et al. In strong near-fine condition with only moderate shelf-wear to fine-edges; moderate-to-pronounced (albeit select) instances of staining, spotting, browning & age-typical toning to front, back covers & spine; slight rubbing along fine-edges of same. Near Fine. [Item #4948]

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