[Item #5606] Original Concert Poster: Moby Grape, Charlatans (February 24-25, 1967). Moby Grape, Charlatans, Victor Moscoso, Roger Hillyard, Ben van Meter.
Original Concert Poster: Moby Grape, Charlatans (February 24-25, 1967)

Original Concert Poster: Moby Grape, Charlatans (February 24-25, 1967)

San Francisco, CA: Family Dog Productions, 1967. First Edition. Single Sheet. A poster (appx. 14" x 20") announcing performances headlined by Moby Grape, along with the Charlatans, during February 24-25, 1967 at the Avalon Ballroom in San Francisco. The great Spanish-American artist Victor Moscoso (b. 1936) created the artwork & graphics reproduced here, & "Moscoso" in facsimile cursive handwriting is found just below blue border of image at pink-purple background near lower right corner (see image). Also credited for "Lights" are "van Meter + Hillyard." Roger Hillyard (b. 1942) was highly involved with the exemplary psychedelic light shows of this era, later became the proprietor of a popular coffee shop, & most lately the practicing resident of a Zen Buddhist center- all in San Francisco. Van Meter (b. 1941) was also a major light show producer & noted experimental filmmaker at this time, & still engages in cutting-edge creativity as of this writing. According to the Talmudic scholarship we have consulted regarding this poster (which is similar in its depth to that of our underground comix from this period), this copy is a second printing, distinguishable from the first printing by a short, thin horizontal dark blue line within lower right lighter blue border, above reference to "KEPLER'S BOOK STORE" in ticket outlet information strip. King, FD-49-RP-2, pg. 106. King writes: "The central image is from a painting by (Jean-Auguste) Ingres (1780-1867, the French neoclassical painter). While some people recognize the origin of the image from Ingres, few people are aware that this is not...taken from the original painting but that Victor Moscoso actually completely re-drew the Ingres image and added the fish to his own drawing. Moscoso says that in art school he was taught a long series of rules about how to make a poster. Among these was that color should not distract from the message of the poster. Moscoso says that the key to his success as a psychedelic poster artist was to do the exact opposite of all the rules he was taught in art school. In this case he has so thoroughly done the exact opposite of the rules he was taught regarding color that color has become part of the main (message) of the poster. He also says that for a poster to be successful it has to grab the attention of the viewer from across the street. This is a poster that has enough power and electricity to make someone cross the street to look at it more closely, and it is generally considered to be one of the most beautiful and successful of the psychedelic images." (pg. 107) Amen to that! A magnificent example of Moscoso's psychedelic style that was reaching its peak only months before the culminative "Summer of Love" that year, in its penultimately rarest contemporary form. From the collection of Dion Wright (b. 1937), a most respected artiste & sculptor who was at the center of the scene that produced this & the many other iconic posters that symbolize a legendary time & place (see Wright's memoir, Tempus Fugitive, item No. 5008). In our eagle-eyed & experienced estimation, this poster is in relatively very fine condition with only a touch of wear & a few tiny bumps, creases at edges & corners. The entire, glorious printed recto is bright & substantially mint. This item is too delicate to be rolled & must be shipped flat to assure no damage, therefore extra shipping costs will be required. Very Fine. [Item #5606]

Price: $125.00