[Item #5697] Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera. Michelle Maria Boleyn, q. r. hand, Howard Hart, Victor Hernandez-Cruz, Jack Hirschman, Bob Kaufman, Eileen Kaufman, Powell Bud.
Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera
Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera
Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera
Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera

Beatitude Vol. II (1992) with: Ephemera

San Francisco, CA: Eileen Kaufman, 1992. First Printing. Stapled Wrappers / Folded Single Sheet. “In the beginning, in the wet / Warm dark place, / straining to break out, clawing at strange cables / Hearing her screams, laughing / ‘Later we forgot ourselves, we didn’t know.’ / Some secret jazz / Shouted, wait, don’t go. / Impatient, we came running, innocent / Laughing blobs of blood and faith, To this mother, father world…” (Bob Kaufman, “War Memoir: Jazz, Don’t Listen To It At Your Own Risk”). Now here’s an interesting San Francisco Renaissance-related rarity: a late memoir to the (then-late) Bob Kaufman (1925-1986), the sui generis Beat surrealist variously described by those who knew him as “an alien” (Thomas Rain Crowe), and “[a man of] powerful, visionary lyricism, of satirical, near Dadaistic leanings” (Jack Micheline). What really makes this issue so unique is that it’s edited and published by Eileen Kaufman, Bob’s wife and co-founding editor of Beatitude Magazine along with William J. Margolis in 1958. Eileen had a unique, ground-level understanding of what made the San Francisco Renaissance so sociologically special; had experienced firsthand the wild transformation of that city from the “frontier-feeling” that City Lights Books founder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti encountered in the mid-1950s to the psychedelic cultural center it became during the late 1960s. If it weren’t for Eileen’s diligent transcription-related work on Bob’s behalf, numerous Kaufman poems would have been scattered to the wind, as if authored by some Beat Bebop Basho. As noted photographer and cultural historian, Raymond Foye has written, “She is responsible, by and large, for Bob being published. She preserved his poems by writing them down sometimes on bar napkins, matchbooks and paper sacks. In fact, Bob’s 1965 poetry volume ‘Solitudes Crowded with Loneliness’ is really her work editorially.” This is what makes this oddly rare volume so special; Eileen’s editorial authority shines off every page & makes what otherwise would be standard fare tributes & memorials so special. Tipped into this Kaufman tribute magazine is a prospectus “Announcing the creation of the Bob Kaufman Foundation for Living Poetry,” whose “goals are to assist poets in attending open readings throughout all parts of our planet, and help in the preparation of multilingual manuscripts for publication, and to explore all possibilities in the creation of original living poetry.” We note that this tipped in, prospectus-looking piece of ephemera is titled “Vol. 1,” as if part of a fundraising operation to fund Issue No. 2 (which, if that were the case, would make Issue No. 2 the “real” first issue of E. Kaufman’s Beatitude). The announcement-prospectus features the poem, “War Memoir: Jazz, Don’t Listen To It At Your Own Risk” (qtd. in this here curation, above), announcements relating to Eileen’s plans for the foundation, addresses & more. Chapbook in stapled wrappers with tipped-in folded single sheet: the first and only printing of these (Eileen Kaufman-edited) late Beatitude productions. Magazine in strong near fine condition with only moderate shelf-wear, light bumping to fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine-edge; a few scattered nick-indentations to the comparably fragile, lightweight paper (printed on the bohemian Budget, surely). Tipped-in prospectus in very fine condition, pristine at all points and essentially as issued. Near Fine / Very Fine. [Item #5697]

Price: $70.00