[Item #5782] 1812: The War That Forged a Nation. Walter R. Borneman.
1812: The War That Forged a Nation
1812: The War That Forged a Nation
1812: The War That Forged a Nation
1812: The War That Forged a Nation

1812: The War That Forged a Nation

ISBN: 9780060531126
New York, NY: Harper Collins, 2004. First Printing. Hardcover. “My overriding goal in writing history has been to get the facts straight and then present them in a readable fashion. I am convinced that knowing history is not just about appreciating the past, but also about understanding the present and planning for the future.” –Walter R. Borneman. Walt Borneman (b. 1952) has undergraduate and graduate degrees in history from Western State College of Colorado (1974, 1975) and wrote his master’s thesis on a town characteristic of the western mining frontier. Borneman received his law degree from the University of Denver (1981). He has won awards from the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, the Tennessee Library Association and Historical Commission, the Colorado Humanities Program, and the Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature. His commentary has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and Washington Post. Borneman has written a number of critically acclaimed historical texts that have been lauded for their accuracy, freshness, and authenticity: Alaska: Saga of a Bold Land (HarperCollins, 2003); The French and Indian War (HarperCollins, 2006); Polk: The Man Who Transformed the Presidency and America (Random House, 2008); The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King (Little, Brown, 2012); American Spring: Lexington, Concord, and the Road to Revolution (Little, Brown, 2014); and MacArthur at War: World War II in the Pacific (Little, Brown, 2016), to name a few. 1812: The War That Forged A Nation, today’s particular volume, is Borneman’s authoritative text on the war that defined America as not only a political superpower, but also as an entity of cultural identity. Although frequently overlooked between the American Revolution and the Civil War, the War of 1812 tested a rising generation of American leaders; unified the United States with a renewed sense of national purpose; and set the stage for westward expansion from Mackinac Island to the Gulf of Mexico. USS Constitution, "Old Ironsides," proved the strength of will of the fledgling American navy; Oliver Hazard Perry hoisted a flag commanding, "Don't Give Up the Ship"; and Andrew Jackson's depleted and malnourished force stood behind it's cotton bales at New Orleans and bested the pride of British regulars, some of the best soldiers in the world at the time. Here are the stories of commanding generals such as America's double-dealing James Wilkinson, Great Britain's gallant Sir Isaac Brock, and country doctor William Beanes, whose capture set the stage for Francis Scott Key to write "The Star-Spangled Banner." During the War of 1812, the United States cast off its cloak of colonial adolescence and—with both humiliating and glorious moments—found the fire that was to forge a nation. Sweeping and concise, with sharp and often exuberant prose. From the collection of Russell Taylor Weil (b. 1927), a prominent retired attorney & collector from Washington, DC. Hardcover in unclipped dust-jacket: First edition, as stated on copyright page, First Printing as indicated by number sequence thereon. Book is in Very Fine condition with only the slightest wear to fine edges; dust-jacket is in Very Fine condition with very minimal smudging to front and back covers and minor wear to fine edges. . Very Fine / Very Fine. [Item #5782]

Price: $35.00 save 20% $28.00