[Item #5801] Bukowski Review No. 1 (Winter 2001-2002). Joan Jobe Smith, Marilyn Johnson, Charles Bukowski, Gerald Locklin, Jay Martin, Wilma Elizabeth McDaniel, Fred Voss, A. D. Winans.
Bukowski Review No. 1 (Winter 2001-2002)
Bukowski Review No. 1 (Winter 2001-2002)
Bukowski Review No. 1 (Winter 2001-2002)

Bukowski Review No. 1 (Winter 2001-2002)

Long Beach, CA: Pearl Editions, 2001. First Printing. Stapled Wrappers. “Charles Bukowski has described himself as the common man, and he has acquired an international readership, but within his lifetime and, to a large extent, today as well, his work has been relegated to the margins of Otherness by the forces of literary politics. He might be said to occupy a ‘counter-canon’ or an ‘alternative canon’ alongside such as Henry Miller, Anais Nin, and Celine. Even more than they, however, Bukowski is not only rejected but indeed scorned by a large part of the literary elite,” (45). This first issue of the Bukowski Review opens with a letter from the editor Joan Jobe Smith (b. 1940) explaining why they decided to create this homage to the controversial poet. Providing a forum focused on the topic and allowing any commentary from “all writers, hagiographers and Bukowski-haters alike,” aims to provoke conversation and debate. Fred Voss (b. 1952), contributing editor and husband of Smith, interviewed francEyE (1922-2009), Ann Menebroker (1936-2016), and Linda King (b. 1940), three women who knew Bukowski intimately and admired his poetry, with the aim to provide a female perspective on the so-called chauvinist, women-hater. Also included in this issue is “Charles Bukowski and the Beats,” an excerpt from Jules Smith’s Art, Survival and So Forth: The Poetry of Charles Bukowski, which describes the contention between the group of writers and Bukowski: “The Beats themselves, for all their emphasis on anarchic individualism, in effect operated as a literary group, with Ginsberg as kingpin and cheerleader…Bukowski could never be part of that: As he told Jon Webb, art does not operate in crowds…But posthumously at least, he has been co-opted as a member of the Beat Generation, and his work certainly stands comparison with the best of theirs,” (57). Several other pieces with commentary on various aspects of Buk and his writings fill the remaining pages along with a sampling of poems by or about him. This first issue, of only four, this is a must have addition to any Bukowski collection. I’ll leave you with this final quote: “Why? Why does poetry and Bukowski matter? Well, they just do. Don’t they?” (3). Included is the return mail insert offering subscription to the review on a yellow horizontal quarter-sheet. Chapbook-format journal in stapled wrappers: First Printing. In Fine condition with minor rubbing, scratching to front, back covers; very minor spotting to the front cover; and moderate chipping along the spine. The title from the front cover bleeds through to the interior of the front cover only slightly. Pages are crisp and clean. Fine. [Item #5801]

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