[Item #5936] Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto). Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)
Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)

Populist Manifesto with: Adieu a Charlot (Second Populist Manifesto)

San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books / White Wall, 1978. Second Printings. Folded Single Sheets. Populist Manifesto signed by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. (Morgan A35e, pg. 75; Morgan A45, pg. 92-93). Easily among Ferlinghetti’s greatest poems, the original “Populist Manifesto” of 1975 is the only poem in the Ferlinghetti oeuvre that was so well-received that its reception begot or necessitated the issuance of a sequel. As was uncovered back in 2017 by Your Devoted Managing Curator and his worn-but-lighted Visionary Mentor, — (the distinguished Beat-scholastic eminence and proud Pusher of Fascinations Burroughsian, Arthur S. Nusbaum) — Ferlinghetti’s “Populist Manifesto” was created in response to the blooming “literary and cultural phenomenon” that was the Second San Francisco Renaissance. Covered extensively in TMB’s debut publication from 2018, “Starting from San Francisco: Thomas Rain Crowe in Conversation with Third Mind Books,” the Second San Francisco Renaissance began in earnest (or at the very least was ‘set-off’ by) Thomas Rain Crowe in collaboration with San Francisco stalwart and native Angelino, the great Neeli Cherkovski, who cut his teeth “apprenticing” informally to the likes of Charles Bukowski, Harold Norse, and Ferlinghetti himself, among numerous laurelled others. At precisely the time Crowe & Co. were martialing the literary energies that still pulsed potently as ever through the state of California & towards San Francisco and the Bay Area, generally — (all part of their efforts to establish a state-spanning, “symbiotic literary syndicate” as YDMC notes in his afterword to the Crowe book) — and these proud poetic integrationists were “taking to the streets” and having a profound impact on the art and social scenes of San Francisco. They approached Ferlinghetti directly, of course — as they took themselves to be direct, heir-like descendants of the First San Francisco Renaissance as it materialized on the fog-flecked “final frontier” of the San Francisco Bay during the mid-to-late 1950s. They made good on this felt consanguinity, — had what, by all accounts seems a veritable riot reinventing themselves via artistic questing towards innovation and generative cultural impact; and in the final analysis did achieve their expressly integrationist goals of “unifying” the disparate poetic “city-states” under a single “nation of nations” in the best Whitmanian sense. Ferlinghetti’s “Populist Manifesto” poems are then direct responses to the youthful, visionary exuberance-&-poetic enthusiasms of Crowe, Cherkovski and compatriots similar. Ferlinghetti listened to them passionately speak about their very own New Vision of an American poetry teeming with potency, life; sacred as the poetries they once were suckled on. Ferlinghetti said, “Alright kids. You say you want to be poets? Gather ‘round and listen close: this is what it takes” before setting pen to paper on the very first swaggeringly corrective “Populist Manifesto.” Before going onto describe the bundle offered here: which contains both the original Manifesto of ’75, as well as its equally illuminous ‘sequel,’ “Adieu a Charlot: the Second Populist Manifesto” (of ’78), I’ll note one last literary-historical tidbit. It is from these seedlike efforts that Ferlinghetti’s later, longer works on the ‘Office of the Poet,’ if you will — 2000’s “What is Poetry?” & the instant classic from 2007, “Poetry as Insurgent Art” — grew; but here are the great bardic Commandments as Lawrence understood them — as brought down from some Sinai or Telegraph Hill. The City Lights Edition of 1975 included here in this bundle, while a second printing (as further enumerated, below) is considerably bettered by the presence of a full Ferlinghetti signature (as opposed to the far-more common abbreviated or last name only) at recto (when folded). Ferlinghetti signature, in thin black pen ink, reads: “lawrence ferlinghetti.” Speaking, next to bibliographic specifics relating to the first Populist Manifesto, the City Lights edition of 1975, labeled the “Second Edition” at copyright notice on verso (when folded), was printed in an impression of 1000 copies in December, 1975. “Adieu a Charlot,” or “The Second Populist Manifesto” was initially printed in July, 1978 in a mirrored impression of 1000 copies. Later that same year, the independent San Francisco-based press, “White Wall” at 2135 Sacramento St. in San Francisco issued this variation, though Bill Morgan, — in the otherwise trusty-&-generally infallible bibliography of Lawrence, which he assembled, offers the following bleak notation: “No information available.” Folded single sheets: second printings, though both collectible in their own right, and the one considerably endowed by presence of LF signature as earlier enumerated. Lastly, a notation re: both broadside’s measurements — the original “Populist Manifesto” sizes in at 11" x 17" unfolded. “Adieu a Charlot.” for its part is the larger of the two, and sizes in at 12 1/2" x 19.” Both broadsides in strong near fine condition with only slightest shelf-wear to fine-edges & corners & some moderate-to-enunciated rubbing & scattered whispers of age-toning variously present at/to same, else appreciably pristine. Fine. [Item #5936]

Price: $100.00