[Item #5993] Away with: Ephemera. Robert Creeley, Bobbie Creeley.
Away with: Ephemera
Away with: Ephemera
Away with: Ephemera
Away with: Ephemera

Away with: Ephemera

ISBN: 0876852789
Santa Barbara, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1976. First Trade Edition. Softcover. “As from afar, / through ringlet of woods, / the huntsman stares in wonder / at the sight, delight / in that light haze of circle / seems to surround you. / Crashing sound, the woods / move. Leaves fluttering, / birds making chatter — your body sans error” (from “Circle,” pg. 51). “Away” was published by John Martin’s great Black Sparrow Press in 1976, and the poems here interred by Creeley are those we can marginally presume were penned during the one-eyed, densely theoretical poet’s marriage to Bobbie Creeley (nee. Louise-Hawkins). Now, Bobbie and Robert divorced in ’76, so the poems of love, lust and longing (which do, in their way, directly evoke the world of generative passions Creeley so inventively assembled in “For Love” (1962), his agreeably masterful full-length debut) were perhaps written before their separation. Now, this will surely strike the Creeley-ite with all manner of literary-critical lightning bolts (a familiar sensation to those who’ve made a habit of reading him, or his Super-Sized poet-compatriot, Charles Olson). Yet this book has value, too for the general reader, — you don’t have to be into “Liquor, Kicks, and Girls” to appreciate Creeley. He, like Gary Snyder, found the interpersonal world and those cinematic tensions which boil within it to be the “stuff” that poetry (or at least his own) intends and was intended to “deal with,” to name. So, it is to this lofty, romantic and admittedly directorial aspiration to which Creeley devotes himself once again — vows he made sure to renew throughout his career…at least once a decade — and the result is predictably sparkling. Obtained from the collection of Robin Eichele (b. 1941), co-founder of the Detroit Artists Workshop, this lot winks at, or represents not only Eichele’s aspirant and scholastically incisive mind (I mean, have you ever tried to read Olson or Creeley at their most abstruse & risked a forehead vein popping?) — but also the ruefully under-explicated Detroit-to-Black Mountain link that binds them. Listen closer, Beat Scholars: items like this prove a fact (or at the very least suggest one) that scholars have either missed, wildly discounted, or perhaps simply have yet to present. Namely, that the Detroit Artists’ Workshop scene was the East Coast equal (in discipleship) of the Duncan-&-Spicer-led Olsonians over in California. The more we at TMB learn about Eichele (and also of his literary-cultural ‘brothersoul,’ John Sinclair) — the greater verity I afford this earlier “take,” or white-hot assumption. It’s a Simple, Easy Beard-Stroker hiding in plain sight, — a Readymade thesis we give you (as Duchamp). It’s a paper in gestation, — and a prospect awaiting more incisive interrogation by “someone” (perhaps, by you). At any rate, this particular copy is decadent with association, — endowed beyond luck or reason with Beat-relational significance. First, it has a bound-in “page” — (so, glued in, at the binding, like it’s a permanent page of its own) — atop FFEP, which is not a “page” but an index card -sized invitation to the Detroit launch/book party for “Away.” It reads: “You and a guest / are cordially invited to a / RECEPTION FOR THE POET / Robert Creeley / Thursday, November 4, 1976 / at 9:30 P.M. / at Paperbacks Unlimited Bookstore / 22634 Woodward Avenue.” (see photos) This is surely enough to warrant swift, unthinking purchase in the mind of any Creeley-reading collector, but there is more: a double-shot of Association and Provenance hits the central nervous system of all perusing this curation and tome by way of a short-but-special signature. Creeley has signed the book to the noted Mimeograph Revolutionary Robin Eichele (to whom we earlier referred), and [again] comes directly from Eichele’s pristinely-kept collection. Creeley's signature, in thin blue pen ink, reads: “For Robin, / with love, / Bob.” Now, all those that Creeley knew best and felt most comfortable around called him “Bob,” — so this in and of itself implies a warmer relation than numerous others [legendarily, we might add] were afforded. The second aspect referred to is the “wink” to Creeley’s 1962 collection mentioned above, “For Love,” — which was a major formative text for both Sinclair and Eichele at the pre-dawn-&-dawn of the Artists’ Workshop Press. So, all points considered, this is a “representative rarity” — penned by Creeley, that polestar of poesy of the Beat and Black Mountain molds, and signed to Eichele, who took up The Great Cause of literary culture-building and “made it new” by making it his own (which was the real lesson, the Snyderian “Real Work,” the whole time). From the collection of Robin Eichele (b. 1941), noted Mimeograph Revolutionary & co-founder (with John Sinclair) of the Detroit Artists’ Workshop. Book in strong near fine condition with only moderate shelf-wear, rubbing, light bumping to fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine-edge at select locales, though all wear generally mild and interior pristine. Ephemera in delectably very fine condition, — clean as the day it was tipped-in or “issued.”. Near Fine-Very Fine. [Item #5993]

Price: $125.00