[Item #6055] Sum No. 4 (1965). John Keys, Ted Berrigan, Paul Blackburn, Kirby Congdon, Fielding Dawson, Ted Enslin, LeRoi Jones, Gerard Malanga, Frank O'Hara, Jackson Mac Low, Ron Padgett, Diane Wakoski, John Wieners.
Sum No. 4 (1965)
Sum No. 4 (1965)

Sum No. 4 (1965)

Buffalo, NY: SUM / Fred Wah, 1965. First Printing. Stapled Wrappers. “The back roads straight, / each hill laid low, / the thickets split, / saplings bent, splintered, broke, / and before my track / each boundary fell. / The clanking tread and engine roar / of my mechanic love / made earth’s rim shake. / And in the grip / of white-knuckled fists, / my shoulders, back, and arms / were charged, and waged their wars. / Though no war’s won, / I ran earth down, / and by maneuvers learned / the ponderous skills / of crawling / a turtle’s slow terrain. / So I, and my age, continued on” (Kirby Congdon, “Tank Driver”). Fred Wah’s “SUM” was published in Buffalo, NY just before that city began to be known for its (now-longstanding) associations with what the great editor-anthologist Don Allen termed “The New American Poetry.” Wah grew up in Saskatchewan (like Joni Mitchell, fans of mid-century music!) and grew up in British Columbia, earning a BA in English Literature from the university there, and transferring on to UNM, where he met Robert Creeley before earning an MA from SUNY Buffalo. Duncan, Creeley, and Olson loom largest in Wah’s poetic pantheon but numerous others influenced him similarly on the path to forging a distinctly original poetic voice, which he invariably and inarguably did achieve. Along the way, he published more than one literary magazine, but the early efforts represented by the seven issues of SUM Magazine Wah published from 1963-1965 show an ear-&-eye for talent far beyond what the masses are capable of; the talent in evidence from the first-risen checkered flag. Oblong, large-format unpaginated softcover in stapled wrappers: the first and only printing of this fourth (of seven) issues of Fred Wah’s “SUM.” From the collection of Robin Eichele (b. 1941), noted Mimeograph Revolutionary & co-founder (with John Sinclair) of the Detroit Artists’ Workshop, who has hand-written (in thin black fountain pen ink) his name [“Eichele”] in a dashing calligraphic script near topmost fine-edge of first-facing leaf. Eichele’s signature, in [what we believe to be] black ink that the cover leaf’s color faded to purple, reads: “Robin Eichele / V: 65.” While technically just an owner’s signature, the hand and collection from which it hails together comprise a most aidful endowment to the lot here offered. In Very Good condition with only moderate-to-enunciated shelf-wear, bumping, & mild horizontal, as well as vertical creasing to, at & near fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine-edge; age-toning, yellowing & artifacts similar to these occurring throughout in low-impact clusters; minor-to-enunciated constellations of rubbing, sunning, to front, back covers throughout, all generally low-impact; bottom two staples securing front cover ensuring it remains affixed as issued, though topmost staple has become dislodged; else complete & clean. Very Good. [Item #6055]

Price: $45.00