[Item #6228] The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series). Richard W. Murphy, Paul Cezanne.
The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)
The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)
The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)
The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)
The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)

The World of Cezanne, 1839-1906 (Time-Life Library of Art Series)

New York, NY: Time-Life Books, 1968. First Edition. Hardcover in Slipcase. "He was not interested, as many of the academic painters of his day were, in reproducing the visible world with photographic exactitude. Nor was he interested, as his contemporaries the Impressionists were, in recording the passing effects of nature. Cézanne believed that in the natural world there were enduring forms and colors, and enduring relationships between them. These forms, colors, and relationships were to Cézanne a language for expressing the emotions aroused in him by nature. That, he believed was the purpose of painting. A picture was not an impression of nature or a bit of social commentary or an illustrated story or a piece of decoration. It was an expression of the emotion evoked in the artist by the enduring forms and colors of the natural world” (p. 7-8). Offered here is “The World of Cézanne,” another gorgeous installment in “The World Of” series by Time-Life — one of the only ‘good things’ that bipartite union of evil (2/3rds of the ‘Time-Life-Fortune’ triumvirate [“evil” to all Burroughsians, that is] ever did). Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) will forever be inseperable from both the Modernists he inspired and the impressionists that, art-historically speaking, “preceded him.” One of the key contributions of this volume, however is to place Cézanne besides the Impressionists as ‘one of them.’ The reader will notice from the quote above that the primary author-editor of this volume, Richard W. Murphy, describes the Impressionists as “his contemporaries” — a corrective reassignation that Your Devoted Managing Curator, for one, strongly supports. The other great contribution of this volume is its fulsome explication of Cézanne’s prophetic, forerunning effect on Cubism. There really is no Cubism without Cézanne — and this volume, by showcasing works like Fernand Leger’s “Woman Sewing (1910)” and Picasso’s “Bread and Compotier with Fruit on a Table” (1908), illustrates this fact. As expected, gorgeous reproductions of work from Aix’s Agent of Light are also featured: so, there’s a lot to dig, here; and the job (on both the creative and production fronts) is enormously well-done. From the collection of Barbara (1935-2023) & Irving (1933-2018) Nusbaum - world travelers, connoisseurs, eminent collectors of art & books, and the dearly beloved late parents of our esteemed founder, Arthur S. Nusbaum. Hardcover in slipcase: the first (and only) edition of the Cezanne installment of Time-Life's handsomely produced "The World Of..." series, though not indicated as such on copyright page. Book in very fine condition, virtually unread and as new. Slipcase correspondingly in very fine condition, with only minute shelf-wear to fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine-edge. Very Fine / Very Fine [Slipcase]. [Item #6228]

Price: $30.00