[Item #6337] The Retreat Diaries. William S. Burroughs.
The Retreat Diaries
The Retreat Diaries

The Retreat Diaries

New York, NY: The City Moon, 1976. First Edition. Stapled Wrappers. “Last summer in Boulder I was talking to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche about doing a retreat at his Vermont center. I asked about taking along a typewriter. He objected that this would defeat the whole purpose of the retreat, like a carpenter takes along his tools–and I see we have a very different purpose in mind. That he could make the carpenter comparison shows where the difference lies: the difference being, with all due respect for the trade of Jesus Christ, that a carpenter can always carpenter, while a writer has to take it when it comes and a glimpse once lost may never come again, like Coleridge’s Kubla Khan. Writers don't write, they read and transcribe. They are only allowed access to the books at certain arbitrary times. They have to make the most of these occasions. Furthermore I am more concerned with writing than I am with any sort of enlightenment, which is often an ever-retreating mirage like the fully analyzed or fully liberated person. I use meditation to get material for writing. I am not concerned with some abstract nirvana. It is exactly the visions and fireworks that are useful for me, exactly what all the masters tell us we should pay as little attention as possible.”--William S. Burroughs, pg. 1. William S, Burroughs (1914–1997) founding father of the Beat Generation, and patron saint of our beloved establishment, is a writer who needs little to no introduction. However, for the uninitiated Burroughs is the dark, bizarre & labyrinthine mind behind works such as: “Junkie” (1953), “Naked Lunch” (1959), “Nova Express” (1964), and “Queer” (1985) just to name a few. Offered here today is the incredibly rare, and endlessly interesting “The Retreat Diaries” (1976). A series of journal entries from the month of August 1975, “The Retreat Diaries” is a snapshot of the great writer's life at that time, warts and all. Included are a few photos of Burroughs from August of 1975, along with an introduction and prose piece by Burroughs’ long time assistant and friend James Grauerholz (b. 1953), and a piece titled “The Dream of Tibet” (1960) by Alan Ginsberg (1926-1997), American poet monolith, and Beat icon. Stapled wrappers. First & only edition, one of a limited printing of 2000 copies, with all points Schottlaender, A35 (A), pg 14; Shoaf, Section I, No 29(a), pg 29. Chapbook is in very fine condition with only minor smudging to front and back covers, and light wear to fine edges. Very Fine. [Item #6337]

Price: $150.00