A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]. William S. Burroughs.
A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]
A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]
A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]
A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]
A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]

A French-Language William S. Burroughs Bundle: Le Metro Blanc (White Subway), [1] with: Les Garçons Sauvages (The Wild Boys) [2]

ISBN: 2020044781,2264001607
Paris, France: Bourgois/Seuil; Christian Bourgois Editeur, 1976; 1984. First French Edition; First French Edition Thus. Softcover. (1) [Shoaf, 26c. p. 39]. Edited and Translated by Mary Beach and Claude Pelieu (and soon after, published) in 1976, “White Subway” was initially released in London by our friend-&-colleague, the great Jim Pennington (through his Aloes Books imprint) in 1973. It compiles sixteen short works of imagination by WSB from the late-fifties to the mid-1960s, all originally published in a variety of independent journals like The Paris Review and Big Table, along with a variety of other Beat-friendly imprints situated even further “underground.” While there are passages of remarkable clarity and linear…“workability,” shall we say, “White Subway” does employ both the cut-in and fold-in techniques, though not as exclusively as some of Uncle Bill’s (comparatively) more impenetrable works. This French Edition is unique in the clear editorial influence of Beach & Pelieu, who—regardless of one’s estimation of their choices (as it pertains to “what” to include in this edition)—are to be celebrated and respected. Given the “cut-up,” frenetic and teleportational quality of Burroughs’ own life, maybe the “all-over-the-place” nature of the First French Edition of “White Subway” enjoys its own distinct metaphorical relation to the life of its author. Though it has been described by some as “a mess,” this author would more charitably describe the considerably-expanded nature of the First French Edition as a “meat-and-cheese charcuterie of All-Encompassing Burroughsiana,” as it contains not only his own work but the many “flavors” of his influence, the “circles” that influence generated. For example: we have not only the sixteen routines present in the Aloes’ editions of “White Subway,” but WSB’s “Retreat Diaries” (which were published by City Moon in the same year of publication as this, 1976) and “Cobblestone Gardens” (itself also published in 1976, but by Charles & Pamela Plymell’s esteemed imprint, Cherry Valley Editions). The platter expands with work by Pelieu and mimeo legend Carl Weissner, who began his correspondence with Burroughs in 1965 and was notably visited by WSB in early June of 1966, whereupon he became Burroughs’ “…new assistant who is working with recorders,” as El Hombre Invisible wrote to Brion Gysin on May 27, 1966. The bottom line with this edition is—if one can endure its overflowing-cup impositions—you are getting much more than you pay for. [ISBN: 2-02-004478-1]. In addition to the First French Edition of “White Subway” described above, the plunger slinks downwards and the bundle expands to include a softcover First Edition Thus of “The Wild Boys,” published here as “Les Garçons Sauvages.” Like “Le Metro Blanc,” this work, too, is translated by Mary Beach and Claude Pelieu. It does us well to remember that “The Wild Boys” was WSB’s first linear novel after more than a decade practicing-&-perfecting the cut-up method for which he is so (in)famous. The novel is set “in the future” that was “1988” (as it was written and first published in 1971). In her fine critical biography of William S. Burroughs, Jennie Skerl writes that "The wild boys represent the release of demonic energy in conscious fantasy, which Burroughs believes is a means of human liberation- both personal and social. By bringing the unconscious irrational desires of the individual and the group to consciousness and by playing with these forces in artistic structures, Burroughs seeks to free, understand, and regulate man's irrational desires." (pg. 83). Offered here is the First French Edition Thus of 1984 (with artwork by Breughel), preceded by the First French Edition of 1973 [Shoaf, 22e. p. 37; Maynard & Miles, D18]. ISBN: ISBN: 2-264-00599-8. (1) Book in near fine condition with moderate shelf-wear, browning to fine-edges and spine, and slight spotting to same (spine) near center-middle; similar slight browning and shelf-wear to fine-edges of back cover, but altogether a satisfactory copy in comparison to what we have seen. (2) Book in near fine condition with only slight bumps to top left, bottom left-hand corners of back cover; the cover wraps—as is common with select mid-late period trade editions from Burroughs (then-) French publisher, Christian Bourgois Editeur—is coming a bit loose from the binding, somewhat fragile but not separated from the rest of the book. With any restoration glue of quality, such a small factor can be remedied with ease, making the “Wild Boys” half of this bundle a bargain to be had. Near Fine. [Item #4026]

Price: $140.00