The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan). Fielding Dawson.
The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)
The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)
The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)
The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)
The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)

The Second Diplomat (On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan)

London, England: The Ferry Press, 1977. First Printing. Stapled Wrappers. Signed by Fielding Dawson. "So, first things first differently, and the first thing was, as it happens, my recent essay 'On Destiny,' which the act of writing caused me to realize that something else was unfolding before me: I realized in my essay, while finding its point, was creating a limitation. In other words, that essay created this one, because it occurred--in a flash--to me, that destiny was inextricably linked to inspiration, and that inspiration involved discipline which somewhere along the line becomes a clue to true intellectual freedom." (pg. 3) So writes American poet, painter, and fiction writer Fielding Dawson (1930-2002) in "The Second Diplomat," his deceptively titled 1977 essay subtitled "On Inspiration, for Robert Duncan." Born in New York City in 1930, Dawson is perhaps most prominently associated with the Charles Olson period of Black Mountain College--at which Dawson was one of many students spellbound by Olson's imposing magnetism. Another key mentor presented itself in the primarily West Coast/San Francisco Renaissance-associated poet, Robert Duncan. While Olson looms larger in most writing regarding the creative-intellectual influences on Dawson, this essay provides permanent evidence that Duncan, too, was potently formative. Dawson--despite being tremendously prolific--did not frequently expound upon the inner workings of his creative process. This essay, "...published on the occasion of the author's first visit to England in 1977," as noted on colophon, is a truly unique exception--a treat for anyone interested either in Dawson or Duncan--a publication which doubles as a case-study in literary influence. Chapbook in stapled wrappers, the first and only printing of this British-born small press production. Signed by Dawson on title page, with signature in thick black felt pen ink reading: “Fielding Dawson.” From the collection of the late artist-poet Erin Black Matson--who with her former husband, the acclaimed poet & educator Clive Matson--was a Bona Fide member of the Beat Generation- morphing into the hippie counterculture during the 1960s in NYC. The Matsons were protégé-colleagues (in lifestyle as much as literature) of Herbert Huncke, Bonnie Bremser et al. The condition of this item (see below) befits its long possession & handling by Erin, a tried-&-true Beat to the end. Book in Very Good-to-Near Fine condition with moderate-to-pronounced shelf-wear to fine-edges of front, back covers; similarly moderate-to-pronounced rubbing esp. along fine-edges; scattered spotting, and tiny dark flecks present at various points of same. Very Good/Near Fine. [Item #4721]

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