Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981). David Amram, Jack Kerouac, Joy Walsh.
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)
Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)

Bundle: Moody Street Irregulars, Issue No.’s 8-9 (The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980; The “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981)

Clarence Center, NY: Moody Street Irregulars, 1980-1981. First Printings. Stapled Wrappers. “Charley Parker Looked like Buddha / Charley Parker, who recently died / Laughing at a juggler on the TV / after weeks of strain and sickness, / was called the Perfect Musician / And his expression on his face / Was as calm, beautiful, and profound / As the image of the Buddha / Represented in the East, the lidded eyes, / The expression that says “All is Well” / — This was what Charley Parker / Said when he played, All is Well…” (from the 239th Chorus of Jack Kerouac’s (1922-1969) 1959 publication, “Mexico City Blues”). Offered here is what may be this writer’s favorite among the “Moody Street Irregulars” bundles we at Third Mind Books are currently offering—The “Special Music Issue” of Summer-Fall 1980 (Issue No. 8) and the “Vanity of Duluoz” Issue of Winter-Spring 1981 (Issue No. 9). Issue No. 8, which—true to the way it’s advertised—is entirely devoted to the Beat Generation’s relationship to music (a relationship in which Jazz, as has been well-documented, looms large) and the few notable musicians, like David Amram—dear friend to Jack Kerouac and musical contributor to Robert Frank’s classic short film, “Pull My Daisy”—whose work and associations inarguably factor into the larger Beat story. Amram appears in an interview alongside Folk music legend, Ramblin’ Jack Eliot by German writer Wolfgang Mohrhenn (all text in English). The issue continues with “Notes on Pull My Daisy,” ostensibly by Editor, Creator-of and Contributor-to MSI, Joy Walsh; Joe Scherzer contributes “Willie Alexander and the Boom Boom Band”; Willie Alexander himself contributes “Letter to Joy”; Jim Christy contributes “Jack and Jazz: Woodsmoke and Trains”; William Sylvester contributes “Space Notes Around ‘October in the Railroad Earth’”; William Gargan contributes a review of “Heart Beat” the film, adapted from the memoirs of Carolyn Cassady; Walsh, Michael F. Hopkins and the great Beat Surrealist, Ted Joans appear with poems about and/or dedicated to Kerouac; Gerald Nicosia appears with the laudably-composed, short autobiographical piece “Travels with Kerouac: How I Finally Got on the Road,” Interviewer Wolfgang Mohrhenn from the issues opening appears on his own with “Bird Lives! Kerouac Gives!” among a few other choice contributions to this full-glass issue of Walsh’s classic Kerouac-centered publication. Issue No. 9 is an equally-brimming, cold imperial pint of Kerouac scholarship & commentary, all of which is centered on Kerouac’s twilight novel “Vanity of Duluoz,” (See TMB #1825) published in 1968, approximately just one year shy of Kerouac’s untimely death. Our friend-&-colleague at the European Beat Studies Network, Gregory Stephenson, contributes “Vanity of Duluoz Reviewed”; George Dardess, Professor and onetime correspondent to the great Beat-&-Beyond biographer John Tytell, appears with “The Questing Continues”; poet-novelist-key associate of Kerouac, John Clellon Holmes, appears with “There’s An Air of Finality to Kerouac’s Latest,” a piece first (somewhat prophetically) published in The National Observer on February 5, 1968; the great William S. Burroughs—the Patron Saint-Demon of our very enterprise—finds his way into the issue by way of an interview with Jennie Skerl, a scholar whose Postmodern interpretations of WSB (see TMB Item #4334) are among the most in vogue & predominantly-taken avenues of analysis in WSB scholarship, today. All this and much, much more in these two information-laden issues of Moody Street Irregulars. Both issues in very fine condition with only faintest, select instances of yellowing to fine-edges of Issue No. 9; faintly-visible, fleck-like rusting to staples at interior & exterior of both issues, otherwise pristine. Very Fine. [Item #4752]

Price: $55.00