[Item #6139] Julie or The Rose (Julie ou La Rose). Ron Padgett, Chris Tysh, George Tysh.
Julie or The Rose (Julie ou La Rose)
Julie or The Rose (Julie ou La Rose)
Julie or The Rose (Julie ou La Rose)

Julie or The Rose (Julie ou La Rose)

ISBN: 0856821020
Kent, England: Transgravity Press, 1978. First Edition Thus. Softcover. Signed by George Tysh to Robin Eichele, Noted Mimeography Revolutionary. While Your Devoted Managing Curator & MC-at-Large has no problem “throwing the curatorial deep ball” — taking swings and stands as the opportunities present themselves, unabashedly and unreservedly telling You, our Beat-&-Beyond, Baudelairian “Reader” whatever the curatorial moment demands, the curious thin volume here offered brings to the table all of the evidence needed (and more) if wishing to make the following claim: namely, that the Beats were an open-source consortium of scholars, not just a yab-yumming troupe of literate bohemians. The fact of scholarly substance is easy to prove in a case like the one Allen Ginsberg provides. Ginsberg — Half-Man, Half-Megaphone, was a one-stop shop of culture-shaping force: and despite having no real exposure to the academic-sociological literature, he single-handedly presaged or developed much of what’s now called “movement theory.” Until approximately 1978, Ginsberg was applied near-totalizing focus to the project of scholastically legitimizing the Beats. The Beats did not need an institutional notary to verify or attest to the fact of their scholarship — a statement to which instances including, but not limited to Lou Welch’s thesis on Stein; “Juniper Fuse,” the late Clayton’s Eshleman’s blinding, magisterial scholastic colossus; or the decade-plus “Saturation Jobs” of Duncan & Olson — here conveniently attest. This is all prefatory soil-setting, however: and function, just as bright-toned trumpets in an overture — and now draw attention to a little-known book by Guillaume Apollinaire, the great boundary-besmirching Surrealist who is actually responsible for divining the term (writing of “Surrealism” a full three years before Breton, the red-faced caustic pope on its coins. In the city of New York in the early-mid 1960s, the Mimeograph Revolution was a flower surging skyward: its tendrils enmeshed themselves into low and high-culture. The poets and writers then active were Burroughsian guerillas, sure — but also a bunch of Boy-Scoutish nerds: bookish, proud, and principally curious. That literary-scholastic curiosity led the great poet & transplant New Yorker, Ron Padget (b. 1942) to search for deep-cuts, one-shots, and other lit-scholastic delicacies that had soundlessly “died” (were not, as it stands, merely ‘out-of-print’ but were (in almost every instance) pragmatically (or literally) unprocurable. Beatitude as a mind-state brings heightens certain attitudes and sentiments: and one of these is the irrepressible urge to pass along what you’re digging on — the amiable, philosophic cornerstone at the heart of the great Beat Friendships they took for material, and the Capital-B, Capital-G “Beat Generation” writ large. Without the young Ron Padgett’s scholarship (he was approximately twenty-six when he first rescued these translations from obscurity and had them re-printed in the great Ted Berrigan’s “C”), who knows how much longer the work would be lost to history. Now enter George Tysh, “Patient One” to Padgett’s Zero — who, ten years after a bag lunch-sized apportionment of verse appeared and stretched itself out across the pages of “C,” — was still lit-up enough by the old, enrapt encounter that he brought forth the full work (now further “democratized”) almost a full ten years later. Without the simple, basic kernel-ingredients of [1] real-deal, hard-fought trench-digging scholarship; & [2] a ‘beatific’ chemical, or natural enthusiasm that propels the work onward (“May it Continue!”), a work like this just simply doesn’t happen — and neither does the Movement which brought it to light. Trade-format softcover: First Edition Thus (obliquely explicated as such on copyright page). From the collection of Robin Eichele (b. 1941), noted Mimeograph Revolutionary & co-founder (with John Sinclair) of the Detroit Artists’ Workshop. This copy is signed by fellow AW associate and comrade, the poet and (Detroit) CCS professor, George Tysh on book’s half-title page. Tysh’s signature, in thin, black pen ink, reads: “for Robin, / with love / from / George & Kris.” In strong fine condition with only mild-to-moderate shelf-wear, light bumping to fine-edges & corners of front, back covers & spine-edge; some age-toning, spotting, light rubbing, nicks & surface-indentations (barely visible) to same, else pristine. Very Fine. [Item #6139]

Price: $45.00