[Item #6260] Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit. Paul Blackburn.
Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit
Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit
Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit

Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit

New York, NY: Totem Press, 1960. First Edition. Stapled Wrappers. Signed by George Tysh and Robin Eichele. A key volume of early poems by Paul Blackburn (1926-1971), the great Black Mountain-&-Beyond "poet's poet" & translator. Born in St. Albans, Vermont, Blackburn was separated from his parents at the age of three-and-a-half, and was raised, primarily by his maternal grandparents. Blackburn’s mother reconnected with her son by the time young Paul turned fourteen and invited him to come live with her in Greenwich Village, which he did. It was at this juncture where Blackburn began to write poetry in earnest. Later, in 1945, Blackburn enrolled at NYU, but ended up graduating from the University of Wisconsin five years later, in 1950. During his years in college, Blackburn read voraciously: undergoing a series independent study of Ezra Pound which included traveling to visit Pound while the Modernist titan was still “interred” at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, in DC. Through the “Pound-in-the-Nuthouse” Circuit, Blackburn came into contact with Robert Creeley, a connection which opened wide the world of Mid-Century American Verse before him. Through Bob, he “met” (either in person, or over correspondence) the following authors: Denise Levertov, Charles Olson, Joel Oppenheimer, Jonathan Williams, among several others. Blackburn was published in two issues of the epochal “Black Mountain Review,” but disavowed the categorical divisions favored by Don Allen in his famed anthology New American Poetry, 1945-1960. The central affective impact or influence point of Pound on Blackburn was “pointing him in the direction of Provençal poetry: as both “knew well the joy of the troubadours, that ecstasy of the heart inflamed with love.” A notable achievement came in 1953, when Blackburn’s translation work (on the aforementioned ‘Provençal troubadours’) won him a Fulbright Fellowship; the following year, Blackburn studied and translated the troubadours in France. This work remains, for some Blackburn’s crowning achievement: but the work in English is of course of great significance and power: a favorite of the late, great Clayton Eshleman who knew Blackburn in New York in the early-1960s. From the collection of scholar, poet and our dear friend Robin Eichele (b. 1941), noted Mimeograph Revolutionary & co-founder (with the late, great John Sinclair [1941-2024]) of the Detroit Artists’ Workshop. Softcover in stapled wrappers: First Edition, though not explicated as such on copyright page. This copy is signed (uniquely; by way of a former ownership signature) by fellow Artists’ Workshop poet (and CCS [College for Creative Studies] Detroit professor), George Tysh, and also by Eichele, who owned it after Tysh. Tysh’s signature, in thin black pen ink at top right-hand corner of title page, reads: “TYSH.” Eichele’s signature, in a slightly-bolder blue pen ink, reads: “Robin Eichele.” In strong near fine condition with only minor-to-moderate rubbing, shelf-wear, light bumping & scattered, light nicks & low-visibility scuffs to front, back covers & spine-edge; light-to-moderate age-toning throughout, including some rusting, browning & bleeding to staples, otherwise clean. Near Fine. [Item #6260]

Price: $50.00